Temporary Fences: 3 Versatile Applications Explored

Posted by Michelle Goodwin

Sat, Sep 19, 2015

Temporary Fences: 3 Versatile Applications for Safety and Liability of Construction Sites and Event Management.

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Topics: Commercial Fence, Temporary Fence, Regulations, barricades, temp fence, chain link, windscreen, bike racks, wire mesh

How to get HOA approval for the fence you want.

Posted by Michelle Goodwin

Thu, Feb 12, 2015

HOA APPROVAL FOR FENCES

The rise of Home Owner Associations inrecent years has seen exponential growth. Before you rush out to install the fence of your dreams, here are some tips of the trade from a Residential fence expert on the possible pitfalls of building that beautiful new fence installation.

One of the biggest mistakes homeowners can make when installing a fence is not checking to see what the by-laws of their Homeowners Association (HOA) require.

You can't assume that what your neighbors have previously done with their fence and yard complies with your particular HOA regulations.

Even though a neighbor might have an admirable fence enclosure or gate dows not mean doesn't mean that your HOA approved that particular fence installation.
We can recall a particular job where a customer scheduled an install for a chain link fence, and as it was in progress, the customer paniced as the HOA just informed her that absolutely no chain link was allowed in their community. Several adjacent yards that had previously used chain link enclosures prior to her request were ordered to remove them and seek other fence options. It turns out that residents were only approved to have wood, vinyl and ornamental aluminum fence in that neighborhood.

We can recall a particular job where a customer scheduled an install for a chain link fence, and as it was in progress, the customer paniced as the HOA just informed her that absolutely no chain link was allowed in their community. Several adjacent yards that had previously used chain link enclosures prior to her request were ordered to remove them and seek other fence options. It turns out that residents were only approved to have vinyl and ornamental aluminum installed in that neighborhood. 

 
In another instance, a customer submitted her information to the HOA weeks in advance. Due to othe fact that she had not heard from the HOA, she assumed that the fence was approved. So, she went forward with the installation. The HOA later stated that they never received her request. The customer then was ordered to redo her fence structure according to her neighborhood's HOA standards, and have the style she selected approved by them.  

HOW TO AVOID COSTLY HOA FENCE INSTALL MISTAKES

Typically, a HOA can take anywhere from one week to six weeks to approve your fence project. Generally speaking, you have to to get the HOA's approval whenever you do anything to the exterior of your residence. This can even include painting and landscaping.

Many HOA ordinances and rules prevent you from constructing chain link, split rail, or wire containment fences because they are not aesthetically appealing. If you install a fence without HOA approval, you can almost be sure you will have to tear it down or face serious fines, as well as aggrevation and time consumption.

THE FOLLOWING ARE
SUGGESTIONS FOR
ENSURING

HOA APPROVAL
ON YOUR
FENCE PROJECT 

 

 

 

1.     Read the regulations provided by the HOA thoroughly. Make sure that you have the most updated version. Call the HOA president or another board member with all questions you have regarding the specific regulations. Document the date and time of call, the name of the person with whom you spoke with, as well as what was said during the conversation.

2.     Make notes on what you want to communicate in your letter to the HOA. In your correspondence try to anticipate any questions the HOA board may have about your project. Always include possible solutions to any problem you think the board may have with your planned project.

3.     Enclose blueprints, pictures and project drawings. Also, be sure to include the specific dimensions of your project and any other pertinent details in your letter. Include images or colors of the materials you will be using. Be clear and precise so your letter will be easily understood.

4.     Make copies of your letter to keep for your records. Mail your request to the homeowners association. Be sure you have included the best ways for members to contact you, such as giving them both a home and work telephone number.

5.     Follow up on your letter if you are not contacted within a week after mailing. Confirm your letter has been received and ask for a date by which the board will render a decision on the plans for your property.

6.     Appeal for a variance if your request is denied and you still want to pursue your plans. An appeal hearing may then be scheduled during which you can present your case to the entire board. You can enlist the support of your neighbors to help bolster your argument.

Be sure to get the approval of the HOA first. It is not up to the fence contractor to find out the rules and regulations or to get approval of the HOA for your project. That being said, a longstanding and professional fence company will gladly help advise you in this process and should go out of their way to help you with your installation concerns.  

They can also supply you with fence samples and pictures of existing installations to help you get the approval of the HOA before starting construction so you won't be on the fence with your Home Owners Association.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE AMERICAN HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION FOR RESOURCES ON REGIONAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS FOR YOUR UPCOMING FENCE PROJECT

CLICK FOR AN AWESOME INFOGRAPHIC ABOUT THE RISE OF THE HOA IN THE USA!

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Topics: Specifications, Residential Fence Choices, Homeowners Association, HOA, Residential Fence, backyard Fence, Fence Permit, Regulations, Insurance, Richmond Fence, fence law, fence regulations, virginia fence code, Maintenance, fences richmond, first time home buyers, codes, hoa fence, fence insurance

Options for Commercial Access Gates and Fence Solutions

Posted by Michelle Goodwin

Thu, Jul 03, 2014

A Professional Fence Company should have a variety options for Commercial Gate applications. The gate systems are designed to restrict unwanted entry and ensure the protection of assets and employees. Gate systems are designed to work efficiently with repeated mechanical use in any setting. Hurricane Fence Company offers the latest in Commercial Gate System trends and technology in a plethora of scales and styles. These maneuverable fence barriers can be engineered to meet the needs of everything from small Residential Secured Access to the most complex structural demands.

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Topics: Military Fence Installations, Military Fence, Government Fence, Fence Design, Perimeter Security, Gates, Specifications, High Security Fence, Ornamental Aluminum, Commercial Fence, Steel Slide Gates, Historical Fence, Fence Permit, Regulations, Maximum Security Fence, Fence Maintenance, Richmond Fence, fence regulations, Maintenance, Aluminum Fence, Comparison, codes, Military Fence Virginia

What Are The State Regulations On Pool Fence Enclosures?

Posted by Dawn Lowndes

Wed, May 15, 2013

Not only are pool enclosures and fences an aesthetically-pleasing way to keep critters out of your pool, it also keeps your pool safe from liabilities (such as children or other unwanted visitors). Studies have shown that isolation fencing (pool fences) vs. property barriers (perimeter fencing) to be much more effective in reducing the rate of acidental drowning. Additionally, certain types of fencing are more effective at keeping children out than others. Specifically, easily-climbed fences with ample visibility such as chain link fences are much less effective pool barriers than non-climb fences. AN example of non-climb fecne is ornamental aluminum fences which allow for visibility, yet are unable to be scaled. Not to mention, great fence looks! To ensure safety, states have imposed pool fence laws and regulations regarding very specific pool barriers. 

Virginia has imposed the following Pool Fence Codes.

All outdoor pools, spas, and hot tubs with a depth of over 2 feet (24 inches) require a fence/barrier enclosurement around it. The enclosure must be non-climbable, and a minimum of 48 inches above completed ground level.

Details of Pool fence Regulations:

Non-climbable barriers are required

  • Solid barriers, such as brick walls, must have no protrusions or indentations.
  • Horizontal design elements less than 45 inches apart must be on the inside face; vertical elements must be spaced at 1 ¾ inches or less.
  • Horizontal design elements greater than or equal to 45 inches apart are permitted to be located on either side of the barrier; vertical elements must be spaced at four inches or less.
  • Openings which constitute a pattern capable of being climbable (such as chain-link) must be limited to 1 ¾ inches when measured horizontally.

Opening limitations

  • 2 inches maximum between ground level and bottom of the fence/barrier.
  • 4 inches maximum between the top of an above-ground pool and the bottom of the fence/barrier.
  • Less than 4 inches for all other openings that do not constitute a pattern of being climbable.
  • 1 ¾ inches (measured horizontally) or 1 ¼ inches (diagonally) for openings in chain link or lattice-type barriers or other barriers with diagonal design elements.

Access Gates

  • Must meet non-climbable barrier requirements.
  • Must be self-closing/self-latching and swing away from the pool.
  • Latches must be 54 inches (4 ½ feet) from bottom and at least three inches from the top of the gate on the pool side.
  • There shall be no openings one half inch or greater within 18 inches of the latch.

Door Alarms

  • Must be labeled in accordance with UL 2017.
  • Must sound immediately and continuously for 30 seconds.
  • Must be heard throughout the house and reset automatically.
  • Must be capable of being deceived temporarily
  • Must be located 54 inches above the door threshold.

*Safety covers for spas and hot tubs meeting ASTM F1346 may be substituted for barriers*

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Topics: Residential Fence, Ornamental Aluminum, Pool Fence, Pool Gate Hardware, Regulations

Do I Need A Fence Permit In Richmond, Virginia?

Posted by Dawn Lowndes

Mon, Feb 28, 2011

In Richmond Vignia the need for a fence permit varies depending on the zoning for the property on which the fence will placed. The height and type of fence being installed can affect this need as well. Typically, commercial and industrial areas are allowed to have a six-foot tall fence, whereas in a residential area, you are limited to four or five feet.

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Topics: Fence Permit, Regulations

Are There Regulations or Codes for Swimming Pool Gates?

Posted by Dawn Lowndes

Wed, Jan 19, 2011


SUMMER IS FUN! 

And so is your very own a backyard pool.  It can be a great source of exercise and relaxation. Kids and adults can join in on the fun, but pools must be made safe for all!

Yes, there are very specific safety regulations on pool fence gates.  The BOCA (Building Officials and Code Administrators) is a code that governs pool barriers and gates, among many other building codes.  It calls for all pool gates to be self-closing and latching.  The latches and hinges can and will differ depending on style of fence.

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Topics: Gates, Code, Pool Fence, Regulations

What Is The Perfect Height For A Pool Fence?

Posted by Dawn Lowndes

Mon, Nov 22, 2010

When deciding on a fence for your pool, the height of the fence is a very important component of your decision. Most manufacturers have fences that are designed to be pool code compliant. As always you should first consult with your city or county’s pool regulations before making any decision This will also give you a good starting point for your decision process.  Most municipalities have a minimum height of 4 feet on pool fences but again check with your city or county regulations.

As you begin your search you will notice there are many different styles  to consider. Not all of these styles will meet pool codes at 4 feet high. The first rule to consider is that the distance between the bottom rail and the next rail (if you are looking at a 3 or 4 rail fence) or top rail needs to be a minimum of 45 inches. Naturally if you are looking at a 3 or 4 rail style of fence you will need to choose a fence taller than 4 feet tall. There are several styles of 3 rail fences that will meet pool code regulations at 54 inches tall. Again, at this height make sure of the distance between the bottom rail and the next rail at the top. Naturally speaking, if you have your mind set on a fence that is as short as possible,  your choices of styles are going to be a little limited.

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Topics: Fence Design, Code, Pool Fence, Regulations

What Are The Insurance Requirements For A Pool Fence?

Posted by Michelle Goodwin

Tue, Oct 12, 2010

Many insurance companies have different requirements when it comes to pool fence specifications. One thing is certain; all insurance companies require a fence around pools to reduce liabilty.

What we mean by pool fence requirements is that the height, material, size and spacing specifications may vary with each insurance company.  Most of the insurance conditions depend heavily on the locality in which the pool and fence is being installed.

It is very important to keep in mind that though the insurance provider or locality requires you to have a specific fence installed, you must also check with any Homeowner’s Association (HOA) and the Building Owners and Code Administrators (BOCA).

A growing number of people are aware of currecnt code which requires that a pool fences must be at least 48 inches tall. This is good, however some insurance companies recommend that you do at least a 6 foot high fence, if allowed by the HOA and your locality, in the hope of reducing any risks that may be associated with the insured’s pool. Additionally, many insurance companies require the homeowner to have a pool gate with a lock to keep unwelcome swimmers out. Gates of pools must also meet specific pool gate codes. Please note that if you have a fence that has been installed that does not meet BOCA, locality or HOA specifications your may required tearing it right back down. 

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Topics: Specifications, Code, Pool Fence, Pool Gate Hardware, Regulations