What Are Passive And Active Force Protection Barriers?

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Tue, Mar 29, 2016

Active Vehicle Barriers

These create a secure environment by blocking a path or route but open or move to allow passage when necessary. Barriers are considered active when they can be moved to allow access, but keeps unwelcome visitors outside.

Vehicle access control points or entry control points where credentials and/or vehicle contents are checked might require installation of an active vehicle barrier (AVB) at the end of the access corridor.

Drop arm barriers  use a beam extending across the road. Usually the beam, or arm, swings vertically to allow the vehicle to pass, but horizontal swinging versions and telescoping beams are also available.  

Retractable Bollards are another common type of AVB. They are frequently used where they are normally in an up position and only need to be operated infrequently.

 
Passive Traffic Barriers

Temporary Fences and Barricades keep the job site or outdoor event enclosed by softly directing foot and vehicle traffic to a designated zone that can be broken down and set up quickly at any location at any point as needed. Typically construction sites use tall movable chain link fences to protect the public from and treacherous sections of a project. 

Swing gates designs require a massive steel counterweight (many thousands of pounds) to balance the beam, and a large capacity hydraulic system to move the beam.

Upswing barrier gates  can be used for a variety of commercial applications, including business parking lots, apartments, and traffic control.

Wedge barriers get their name because of their wedge shape when viewed from the side. They are also sometimes called plate barriers because the most common type uses a steel plate angled toward the approaching vehicle. This can be achieved by placing Jersey wall barriers in a way that creates a maze for the vehicle to maneuver.

This effectively forces the vehicle to slow down while permitting clearance.

Passive barriers are permanent obstacles that protect a building or property from vehicle interference.

Passive barriers have no moving parts; their effectiveness relies on their ability to absorb energy and transmit it to their foundations. 

Concrete walls if properly designed and constructed, can certainly perform well as a barrier. Key elements in the effectiveness of such walls are their height, thickness, reinforcement, and foundation depth.

Terrain can be used as an effective vehicle barrier. It is difficult for certain types of vehicles to pass or traverse ditches that have sufficient width, depth and overly steep side slopes. Berms also can be effective if properly configured.

Bollards are short, vertical posts used to protect potentially vulnerable structures or objects from damage by moving vehicles.

Designed for versatility, these posts range in size from 24” to 42”in height, and come in variable diameters to meet a location’s specific security requirements.

Bollards can be used to maintain a more natural look, while providing crash-rated security. 

 

Security provided by barriers is available with many different degrees of safety options.Whether the solution is permanent or somewhat temporary, depends on a facility's unique needs as well as various external factors.  Safety access, value of the secured property, and the risk of intrusion associated within the enclosed area are all essential questions to arriving at your barrier solution.

Barrier systems are built to specific standards set forth by the Department of State (DOS) and meet three levels of security K4, K8, and K12.  

Depending on the facility, the level of protection can be increased or decreased by the use of these barrier enclosures.

DSC_4543.jpg

Active Force Protection Barriers are used to create ATFP entry systems and gates.

The appropriate type of barrier depends on a number of factors. In this article we consult some of the most common barrier security applications.Security provided by barriers is available with many different degrees of safety options.Whether the solution is permanent or somewhat temporary, depends on a facility's unique needs as well as various external factors.  

55f709d0e6ccc.image.jpg

Safety access, value of the secured property, and the risk of intrusion associated within the enclosed area are all essential questions to arriving at your barrier solution.

Barrier systems are built to specific standards set forth by the Department of State (DOS) and meet three levels of security K4, K8, and K12.  

Depending on the facility, the level of protection can be increased or decreased by the use of these barrier enclosures.

DSC_4543.jpg

 

 

 

Topics: Bollards, ATFP, High Security Fence, Commercial Fence, Fence, fence law, high security, access gates, barriers, crowd control, pedestrian traffic

History & Psychology CH. 2: Where did the perimeter fence come from?

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Fri, Jan 03, 2014

History & Psychology CH. 2: Where did the perimeter fence come from?

As the great English agriculturist Arthur Young said commenting on eighteenth century French peasants’ toil on their small patrimonies, “Give a man the secure possession of a bleak rock and he will turn it into a garden. Give him a nine years' lease of a garden and he will convert it into a desert." Being instrumental in the culture of property, the fence fostered long-term thinking and constructive effort. 

Land Ownership

Land ownership demanded lasting commitment and care that were beyond the capacity of a single individual, so since very early on land was attached not to the individual but to a family. In early Hindu and Greek law, land could not be sold or transferred to another family, either by bequest or as a dower. A father who had land was compelled to leave it to his sons. If he had no sons he must pass it to the nearest relation. Since no one could take away family land upon marriage, the fence was associated with native home and was helped facilitate inferred communication in a domestic context.

Having a strong visibility bias, the fence is an open declaration of intention. It says on the part of an occupant "I am here and planning to stay." This makes it an appropriate device to be associated with law.

Numa, the second king of Rome laid down in 7th century B.C. that each man should surround his land with a boundary and set up landmarks of stone or modern day bollards. He dedicated these landmarks to the god Terminus, and ordained that sacrifices should be offered up to him every year, appointing the Festival of the Terminalia. This worship of boundaries was meant to celebrate the conquest of the land of Rome from the Latinians and the Sabines originally occupying the region. Victory would not have been possible without the will of the gods and the fence being a symbol of this triumph had to be honored in appreciation. Thus the fence was invested with meaning and gained value.

roman fence

Further, in 7th century England, the King of Wessex added a new function for private peremiter boundaries: Responsibility. The business of protecting crops from cattle, was on the land-owner. The king proclaimed that a homestead must be fenced winter and summer. If it is not fenced and his neighbor's cattle get in through his own gap, he has no right to anything from that cattle or the the owner of the property it wandered onto.

Fencing America

In New America, John Winthrop, the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony even passed a policy stating: "That which lies common, and hath never been replenished or subdued, is free to any that possess and improve it."

worm fence   Gettysburg resized 600

Pictured Above: A Worm Fence in Gettysburg Pennsylvania circa 1600.

Circa 1600 A.D., Jamestown Virginians were amazed to discover a fence structure that they'd not seen before. A worm fence is a pereimeter fence that lays logs atop each other at an angle eliminating the need for posts of any kind. The early settlers used their spare logs while yielded and clearing the residential land they forged.

Next Hurricane Weekly Fence Post

Chapter 3: The modern perimeter fence and how it helps shape current cultures.

Topics: Bollards, Perimeter Security, Specialty Fence, Residential Fence, Property Value, Temporary Fence, backyard Fence, fence timing, Historical Fence

What Type Of Fence Styles Can Be ATFP Compliant?

Posted by Kristen Fugere on Wed, Sep 05, 2012

Essentially, any type of fence can be modified to meet AT/FP requirements.

Data Center Security FenceATFP stands for Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection, as defined by the US Army and other federal entities. This term refers to the amount of force a structure can withstand without being compromised by an incoming attack.

The AT-FP ratings are achieved by reinforcing a fence structure with steel cables that run along the fence, into the ground, terminating in concrete footers. These ratings are typically referred to as crash ratings, or “K” ratings. There are three K ratings that are achievable; K4, K8, and K12. The different ratings refer to the amount of weight the structure can resist and remain intact. 

Typically, if business or government institution is going to spend this amount of money on a high tech fence, they may also want a good-looking fence. The most aesthetically pleasing type of fence that can be modified to achieve ATFP ratings is ornamental fence. Ornamental fence is often referred to as “wrought iron”, but are in fact made of aluminum or steel. Iron is an outdated material. These contemporary fence alternatives are more economical, as well as outlasting their dated counterparts. These style fences are often found around the perimeter of military institutions, data centers, federal buildings or even schools.

Alternatively, jails and other institutions that must remain secure without the superficial attributes can also apply K rated cables to chain link fences, achieving the same degree of security. These ATFP compliant chainlink fences are usually constructed of 6 gauge wire as opposed to the more commercially applied 9 gauge wire. This thicker wire, coupled with cable reinforcement and either SS 40 or SCH 40 pipe, can achieve AT/FP federal security standards.

Data Center FenceWhile ornamental styles are the most common installations of crash rated fences, even a wooden fence could be modified to reach the same standard. One way to achieve AT/FP compliance in this type of fence installation is to install a line of bollards, again reinforced with steel cables, in front of a wood fence. This would allow it to attain a K-rated fence standard. Bollards are short, vertical posts used to protect potentially vulnerable structures or objects from damage by moving vehicles. Designed for versatility, these posts range in size from 24” to 42” in height, and come in variable diameters to meet a location’s specific security requirements. Bollards can be used to maintain a more natural look, while providing crash-rated security.

As you can see, Anti-terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) standards can be met in any number of ways in the fence industry. A knowledgeable fence contractor has the capability to help customers design and build crash-rated fences out any material the customer desires. As our society continues to evolve, so do potential acts of terror, and Top Notch Fence Company’s will stay on the cutting edge of technology to continue to provide our customers with ATFP compliant crash rated fences.

Article contributed by Meagan Stone.

Topics: Bollards, ATFP, Military Fence, High Security Fence, Terrorism, Maximum Security Fence

What Are Bollards And How Are They Used?

Posted by Kristen Fugere on Mon, Jul 23, 2012

Bollards are short, vertical posts used to protect potentially vulnerable structures or objects from damage by moving vehicles. Designed for versatility, these posts range in size from 24” to 42” in height, and come in variable diameters to meet a location’s specific security requirements. Bollards are available in four types:

  • Collapsible bollards: Used for traffic control applications, these bollards are able to be unlocked and taken down with the use of a key or an allen wrench in order to allow traffic to pass through an area.
  • Removable bollards: Removable bollards can be unlocked from their support base to allow temporary access to protected areas when necessary.
  • Manually assisted bollards: Manually assisted bollards are hydraulically raised by unlocking the bollard and manually pulling it upward until it locks in place.
  • Automatic pop-up bollards: Used for protection against criminal or terrorist attacks, these crash-rated bollards will automatically deploy when an alarm is activated. They are used frequently around government facilities and military installations.

bollard

The sheer versatility of bollard systems lends themselves to several other applications, including the protection of:

  • Ship moorings

  • Fences and walls in parking garages and lots

  • Gate operators

  • Access control devices within gated communities

 

 

Whether it’s controlling traffic patterns, securing a gated community, or providing a major deterrent against criminal and terrorist attacks, bollards are an integral part of any perimeter security system that can be obtained at a relatively minor cost.

While some companies can supply specialty bollard systems and most contractors can install any generic stationary bollard, some companies can supply and install both. A qualified company can help you find the right product for your application and answer any of your bollard-related questions.

Topics: Bollards

What is ATFP? And Related K4 K8 K12 Perimeter Security?

Posted by Dawn Lowndes on Thu, Jun 07, 2012

atfp fence k rated

A REAL BARRIER TO TERROR

Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection (ATFP) is generally defined as a federal security program formed to protect personnel, information, and critical resources from outside attacks.  These attacks could be attempted by the use of Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPG), truck bombs, or any means of weighted attack force. Areas of planned security could include law enforcement personnel, intelligence and training. For our purposes we will only discuss the physical security of a site.

ATFP standards set by the federal government can be used to protect areas such as military vicinity, state and local courthouses, banking centers and certain corporate areas. Corporations can deal with security sensitive matters like financial markets and Internet service providing computer farms.

ATFP secured structures can actually be made better able to prevent blasts from having a great effect. This can be done by ‘hardening’ the exterior of the structure by blast proofing the walls and glass. The can be achieved with the addition of concrete and steel wall supports. A “progressive collapse” structural design can be created to limit the likelihood of a complete building collapse in the event of an attack.

Perimeter security is typically created by the addition gates and entry areas and is most often delineated by a fence. ATFP fence is a standard fence that is upgraded or one that is originally manufactured to ATFP fence specifications. ATFP perimeter security can be of a very different nature.  

ATFP Entry Systems or Gates are created by using passive and/or non-passive barriers.  These systems are specifically designed for the level of protection that the facility mandates.

Passive Barriers allow the passage of entering vehicles at all times. This can be achieved by placing jersey wall barriers in away that creates a maze for the vehicle to maneuver.  This effectively forces the vehicle to slow down while permitting access.  This is only one example of this type of passive barrier.

Non-Passive Barriers are actually permanent entry obstacles. These are things like bollards, wedge barricades, drop arms, slide gates and newly designed net systems. These Barricades can be used in conjunction with fence gates or can actually be mounted to fence gates. They are used more often than passive barriers because they can be moved in and out of their location with ease. This allows instant entry and immediately re-barricaded areas.

ATFP passive perimeter security can be accomplished with the use of steel cables or steel guardrails. This can also be setup by any combination of natural and manmade features when natural barriers are not sufficient or present. Distance can be a great ATFP device when used in combination with an uneven or bumpy surface. This can also be achieved with ditches and berms, or large bolder (3ft. x 5ft.) placement and forestation. This will slow down any moving vehicle or a truck bomb that is attempting to implode a building surface. Remember that AT/FP perimeters are specifically intended to stop only vehicle traffic. This perimeter prevents a bomb threat, not theft.  

Bear in mind that it is much easier to implement the AT/FP standards when working on new construction rather than attempting to retrofit the system into an already existing environment.  When retrofitting, much of the plan design work will be required to be done onsite and in an emergent way. This can lead to extreme design difficulties and can turn out to be very costly. Conceiving a building or site around AT/FP barrier implements is much easier than situating the AT/FP elements around already existing structures. Imagine attempting to widen the distance between a building and the adjacent road line. It would be much easier to initially plan this rather than propose it at a later point in time.

Some additional research should be done to understand ‘K ratings’ (K4|K8|K12). These ratings are somewhat complex and are standards set by the government to quantify and ensure the inflexibility of implemented AT/FP barrier devices.  Read ‘K ratings’ (K4|K8|K12 Fence) Informational Blog

 

Article contributed by fence professional John Lowndes.

Topics: Bollards, Military Fence Installations, ATFP, Military Fence, Government Fence

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