What Are Passive And Active Force Protection Barriers?

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Tue, Mar 29, 2016

Active Vehicle Barriers

These create a secure environment by blocking a path or route but open or move to allow passage when necessary. Barriers are considered active when they can be moved to allow access, but keeps unwelcome visitors outside.

Vehicle access control points or entry control points where credentials and/or vehicle contents are checked might require installation of an active vehicle barrier (AVB) at the end of the access corridor.

Drop arm barriers  use a beam extending across the road. Usually the beam, or arm, swings vertically to allow the vehicle to pass, but horizontal swinging versions and telescoping beams are also available.  

Retractable Bollards are another common type of AVB. They are frequently used where they are normally in an up position and only need to be operated infrequently.

 
Passive Traffic Barriers

Temporary Fences and Barricades keep the job site or outdoor event enclosed by softly directing foot and vehicle traffic to a designated zone that can be broken down and set up quickly at any location at any point as needed. Typically construction sites use tall movable chain link fences to protect the public from and treacherous sections of a project. 

Swing gates designs require a massive steel counterweight (many thousands of pounds) to balance the beam, and a large capacity hydraulic system to move the beam.

Upswing barrier gates  can be used for a variety of commercial applications, including business parking lots, apartments, and traffic control.

Wedge barriers get their name because of their wedge shape when viewed from the side. They are also sometimes called plate barriers because the most common type uses a steel plate angled toward the approaching vehicle. This can be achieved by placing Jersey wall barriers in a way that creates a maze for the vehicle to maneuver.

This effectively forces the vehicle to slow down while permitting clearance.

Passive barriers are permanent obstacles that protect a building or property from vehicle interference.

Passive barriers have no moving parts; their effectiveness relies on their ability to absorb energy and transmit it to their foundations. 

Concrete walls if properly designed and constructed, can certainly perform well as a barrier. Key elements in the effectiveness of such walls are their height, thickness, reinforcement, and foundation depth.

Terrain can be used as an effective vehicle barrier. It is difficult for certain types of vehicles to pass or traverse ditches that have sufficient width, depth and overly steep side slopes. Berms also can be effective if properly configured.

Bollards are short, vertical posts used to protect potentially vulnerable structures or objects from damage by moving vehicles.

Designed for versatility, these posts range in size from 24” to 42”in height, and come in variable diameters to meet a location’s specific security requirements.

Bollards can be used to maintain a more natural look, while providing crash-rated security. 

 

Security provided by barriers is available with many different degrees of safety options.Whether the solution is permanent or somewhat temporary, depends on a facility's unique needs as well as various external factors.  Safety access, value of the secured property, and the risk of intrusion associated within the enclosed area are all essential questions to arriving at your barrier solution.

Barrier systems are built to specific standards set forth by the Department of State (DOS) and meet three levels of security K4, K8, and K12.  

Depending on the facility, the level of protection can be increased or decreased by the use of these barrier enclosures.

DSC_4543.jpg

Active Force Protection Barriers are used to create ATFP entry systems and gates.

The appropriate type of barrier depends on a number of factors. In this article we consult some of the most common barrier security applications.Security provided by barriers is available with many different degrees of safety options.Whether the solution is permanent or somewhat temporary, depends on a facility's unique needs as well as various external factors.  

55f709d0e6ccc.image.jpg

Safety access, value of the secured property, and the risk of intrusion associated within the enclosed area are all essential questions to arriving at your barrier solution.

Barrier systems are built to specific standards set forth by the Department of State (DOS) and meet three levels of security K4, K8, and K12.  

Depending on the facility, the level of protection can be increased or decreased by the use of these barrier enclosures.

DSC_4543.jpg

 

 

 

Topics: Bollards, ATFP, High Security Fence, Commercial Fence, Fence, fence law, high security, access gates, barriers, crowd control, pedestrian traffic

Handling fence damage through insurance and an appeal to your HOA for repairs

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Fri, Apr 17, 2015

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While damage to commercial fence is usually caused by vehicles hitting the fence and gates,
or by vandals cutting fence to gain access to business properties to steal from company vehicles or steal stored company materials.

No matter how you slice it, the homeowner or business owner, depending on the amount of damage, can engage insurance companies to check on policy coverage and deductibles.

HOW DO INSURANCE ESTIMATES ON DAMAGED FENCES WORK?

Fence damage is common in residential and commercial properties. Damage to residential fence is most often caused by fallen trees, wind, or bad storms. 

Residential property fence damage will require the homeowner to call their insurance company and discuss damage to the fence and decide if the insurance claim is valid depending on the amount of damage and the cost of repair. 

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INSURANCE FOR ON FENCE REPAIRS:

Another variable will be the deductible on the insurance policy that the homeowner has with the insurance company. If the insurance company deems damage to the fence is an insurance claim, the insurance company usually will ask the homeowner to get three separate estimates on the scope of work from local or your preferred fence contractor and turn them into the insurance agent for processing. 

broken chain link

In some cases the insurance company will call three fence companies for the homeowner, and request estimates.

The professional fence contractor will go to the property to price fence repairs, and send the quote directly to the insurance company to handle all aspects of the repair.

In either case, it is up to the homeowner to decide if they prefer to involve the insurance company for the fence fix or if they wish to pay out of pocket.

 
If the damage to the fence is minimal, the homeowner should probably not involve the insurance company. This is becuse the deductible may not be met depending on the amount of fence damage.
A phone call to the insurance agent or checking the insurance policy will give the homeowner the amount of the deductible to decide if an insurance claim is valid.

DAMAGE BY VANDALS

Commercial property fence damage due to vandals usually will not require a call to the insurance company for repair cost.  These claims are usually so small that it would not meet their deductible. 

The only reason why an insurance company would be called due to vandalism to a fence would be because other property on the site has been stolen or damaged, and the fence repair can be added to the total insurance claim. 

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VEHICLE FENCE DAMAGE

The most common damage to commercial fence is vehicles running into fence and gates entering or leaving business properties.  In most cases, the business can get information from the person who damaged the fence and their insurance company would pay the full amount for repairs and the owner would not be responsible for the cost. This only happens in cases where people are caught hitting the fence or gates with their vehicles. 
 

The business would be required to call their insurance company and report damage and ask for an agent to visit the property to record damage. After the insurance agent has recorded the fence damage, the fence company would be called to price fence repairs and turn in quotes to the insurance company for review. The insurance company and the fence contractor usually handle the repair and cost.

If no one witnesses the incident and no one claims responsibility for the damage, the business owner will have to call his or her insurance company to make a claim. Typically, the procedure to have insurance companies pay for damages would be the same as in residential fence damage claims.
 

 

 

Topics: Fence Design, Perimeter Security, Homeowners Association, Ornamental Aluminum, Property Value, Fence Permit, Insurance, Fence, Richmond Fence, fence law, fence regulations, Maintenance, residential fence damage, wood fence, fence insurance, fence repair, commercial fence damage, vehicle fence damage, fence repair damage

How to get HOA approval for the fence you want.

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Thu, Feb 12, 2015

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The rise of Homeowner Associations in recent years has seen exponential growth. Before you rush out to install the fence of your dreams, here are some tips of the trade from a Residential fence expert on the possible pitfalls of building that beautiful new fence installation.

One of the biggest mistakes homeowners can make when installing a fence is not checking to see what the by-laws of their Homeowners Association (HOA) require.

You can't assume that what your neighbors have previously done with their fence and yard complies with your particular HOA regulations.

Even though a neighbor might have an admirable fence enclosure or gate doesn't mean doesn't mean that your HOA approved that particular fence installation.

We can recall a particular job where a customer scheduled an install for a chain link fence, and as it was in progress, the customer panicked as the HOA just informed her that absolutely no chain link was allowed in their community. Several adjacent yards that had previously used chain link enclosures prior to her request were ordered to remove them and seek other fence options. It turns out that residents were only approved to have vinyl and ornamental aluminum installed in that neighborhood. 

In another instance, a customer submitted her information to the HOA weeks in advance. Due to the fact that she had not heard from the HOA, she assumed that the fence was approved. So, she went forward with the installation. The HOA later stated that they never received her request. The customer then was ordered to redo her fence structure according to her neighborhood's HOA standards, and have the style she selected approved by them.

Typically, a HOA can take anywhere from one week to six weeks to approve your fence project. Generally speaking, you have to to get the HOA's approval whenever you do anything to the exterior of your residence. This can even include painting and landscaping.

HOW TO AVOID COSTLY HOA FENCE INSTALL MISTAKES

Many HOA ordinances and rules prevent you from constructing chain link, split rail, or wire containment fences because they are not aesthetically appealing. If you install a fence without HOA approval, you can almost be sure you will have to tear it down or face serious fines, as well as aggravation and time consumption.

 

THE FOLLOWING ARE SUGGESTIONS TO ENSURE HOA APPROVAL ON YOUR FENCE PROJECT


1.
     Read the regulations provided by the HOA thoroughly. Make sure that you have the most updated version. Call the HOA president or another board member with all questions you have regarding the specific regulations. Document the date and time of call, the name of the person with whom you spoke with, as well as what was said during the conversation.

2.     Make notes on what you want to communicate in your letter to the HOA. In your correspondence try to anticipate any questions the HOA board may have about your project. Always include possible solutions to any problem you think the board may have with your planned project.

3.     Enclose blueprints, pictures and project drawings. Also, be sure to include the specific dimensions of your project and any other pertinent details in your letter. Include images or colors of the materials you will be using. Be clear and precise so your letter will be easily understood.

4.     Make copies of your letter to keep for your records. Mail your request to the homeowners association. Be sure you have included the best ways for members to contact you, such as giving them both a home and work telephone number.

5.     Follow up on your letter if you are not contacted within a week after mailing. Confirm your letter has been received and ask for a date by which the board will render a decision on the plans for your property.

6.     Appeal for a variance if your request is denied and you still want to pursue your plans. An appeal hearing may then be scheduled during which you can present your case to the entire board. You can enlist the support of your neighbors to help bolster your argument.

Be sure to get the approval of the HOA first. It is not up to the fence contractor to find out the rules and regulations or to get approval of the HOA for your project. That being said, a longstanding and professional fence company will gladly help advise you in this process and should go out of their way to help you with your installation concerns.  

They can also supply you with fence samples and pictures of existing installations to help you get the approval of the HOA before starting construction so you won't be on the fence with your Home Owners Association.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE AMERICAN HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION FOR RESOURCES ON REGIONAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS FOR YOUR UPCOMING FENCE PROJECT

CLICK FOR AN AWESOME INFOGRAPHIC ABOUT THE RISE OF THE HOA IN THE UA!S

 

Topics: Specifications, Residential Fence Choices, Homeowners Association, HOA, Residential Fence, backyard Fence, Fence Permit, Regulations, Insurance, Richmond Fence, fence law, fence regulations, virginia fence code, Maintenance, fences richmond, first time home buyers, codes, hoa fence, fence insurance

Repairing your Residential or Commercial fence enclosure

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Tue, Sep 02, 2014

fence repairs, fence insurance, damaged fences, fence repair, fence repair richmond, fence repair norfolk, fence repair va beach, fence repair raleigh, residential fence repairs, commercial fence repairs

While damage to commercial fence is usually caused by vehicles hitting the fence and gates,
or by vandals cutting fence to gain access to business properties to steal from company vehicles or steal stored company materials.

In either case, the homeowner or business owner, depending on the amount of damage,
can engage insurance companies to check on policy coverage and deductibles.

WHO DOES INSURANCE ESTIMATES ON DAMAGED FENCES?

Fence damage is common in residential and commercial properties. Damage to residential fence is most often caused by fallen trees, wind, or bad storms. 

Residential property fence damage will require the homeowner to call their insurance company and discuss damage to the fence and decide if the insurance claim is valid depending on the amount of damage and the cost of repair. 

fence repairs, fence insurance, damaged fences, fence repair, fence repair richmond, fence repair norfolk, fence repair va beach, fence repair raleigh, residential fence repairs, commercial fence repairs

 

INSURANCE POLICIES ON FENCE REPAIRS:

Another variable will be the deductible on the insurance policy that the homeowner has with the insurance company. If the insurance company deems damage to the fence is an insurance claim, the insurance company usually will ask the homeowner to get three separate estimates on the scope of work from local or your preferred fence contractor and turn them into the insurance agent for processing. 
broken chain link

In some cases the insurance company will call three fence companies for the homeowner, and request estimates.

The professional fence contractor will go to the property to price fence repairs, and send the quote directly to the insurance company to handle all aspects of the repair.

In either case, it is up to the homeowner to decide if they prefer to involve the insurance company for the fence fix or if they wish to pay out of pocket.

 
If the damage to the fence is minimal, the homeowner should probably not involve the insurance company. This is becuse the deductible may not be met depending on the amount of fence damage.
A phone call to the insurance agent or checking the insurance policy will give the homeowner the amount of the deductible to decide if an insurance claim is valid. 

FENCE DAMAGE BY VANDALS

Commercial property fence damage due to vandals usually will not require a call to the insurance company for repair cost.  These claims are usually so small that it would not meet their deductible. 

The only reason why an insurance company would be called due to vandalism to a fence would be because other property on the site has been stolen or damaged, and the fence repair can be added to the total insurance claim. 

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VEHICLE FENCE DAMAGE

The most common damage to commercial fence is vehicles running into fence and gates entering or leaving business properties.  In most cases, the business can get information from the person who damaged the fence and their insurance company would pay the full amount for repairs and the owner would not be responsible for the cost. This only happens in cases where people are caught hitting the fence or gates with their vehicles. 
 

The business would be required to call their insurance company and report damage and ask for an agent to visit the property to record damage. After the insurance agent has recorded the fence damage, the fence company would be called to price fence repairs and turn in quotes to the insurance company for review. The insurance company and the fence contractor usually handle the repair and cost.

If no one witnesses the incident and no one claims responsibility for the damage, the business owner will have to call his or her insurance company to make a claim. Typically, the procedure to have insurance companies pay for damages would be the same as in residential fence damage claims.
 

 

 

Topics: Fence Design, Perimeter Security, Homeowners Association, Ornamental Aluminum, Property Value, Fence Permit, Insurance, Fence, Richmond Fence, fence law, fence regulations, Maintenance, residential fence damage, wood fence, fence insurance, fence repair, commercial fence damage, vehicle fence damage, fence repair damage

Va. Fence Law: Who's Actually Responsible for the Cost of My Fence?

Posted by Michelle Goodwin on Fri, May 09, 2014

As the weather warms, Virginian's are beginning to make their outdoor wishlists. If you're thinking of installing an above or in-ground swimming pool or trying your hand at urban or rural farming, the majority of the information in this article will greatly help you in understanding the ordinances, cost and responsibilities surrounding your 2014 outdoor projects. And—you might have to spend less than you think.

The info in this article is coming straight from the Virginia Legislative Branch's website http://leg1.state.va.us/. Most of what is covered is state level laws but each locality has its own set of governing laws that tend to vary greatly—and lean specific to that geographic location and the prevailing uses for fence installation in that area.

Like most laws, fence regulations can be somewhat convoluted. That's why it's of the utmost importance to pick a fence contractor that understands Virginia's fence laws at the state level. Laws are set by each locality. Most statutes that accompany Virginia fence installation are in reference to livestock(1); fence and its use for pools(2) and railroads(3) are also mentioned in some codes.

Swimming Pool Laws

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For example, if you live in an area that has ordinances that excersizes the maximum punitive actions allowed by § 15.2-921 and you violate said ordinances by not having a fence around a pool, or the fence takes more than 24 days to complete, a person could face as much as $7200 in fines plus court costs or 2 years in jail. The last part of § 15.2-921 simply states "Any such ordinance may be made applicable to swimming pools constructed before, as well as those constructed after, the adoption thereof. No such ordinance shall take effect less than ninety days from the adoption thereof, nor shall any such ordinance apply to any swimming pool operated by or in conjunction with any hotel located on a government reservation." In short ordincances are not required to include a grandfather clause, take atleast 90 day before becoming active and do not apply to swimming pools operated by or in conjunction with any hotel on a government reservation.

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Since the Virginia legal guideline for pool fences is the most strait forward we can cover that first. 

Virginia code § 15.2-921 defines the word "fence" as a close type vertical barrier not less than four feet in height above ground surface.

woven steel wire, chain link, picket or solid board type fence, or a fence of similar construction which will prevent the smallest of children from getting through.(2) Keep in mind, that this definition is only in reference to residential property."Ordinances may require professional fence construction for new or existing swimming pools." This means that if a fence is less that 4 feet doesnt count for the perpose of fencing a pool.A pool or more specifically a swimming pool is defined as "any outdoor man-made structure constructed from material other than natural earth or soil designed or used to hold water for the purpose of providing a swimming or bathing place for any person or any such structure for the purpose of impounding water therein to a depth of more than two feet."(2) this definition is prefeced with the word "includes" in § 15.2-921 meaning that broader definitions may also apply.The code of virginia § 15.2-921 grants any locality the ability to "adopt ordinances making it unlawful for any person to construct, maintain, use, possess or control any pool on any property in such locality, without having a fence completely around such swimming pool. Such ordinances also may provide that every gate in such fence shall be capable of being securely fastened at a height of not less than four feet above ground level; that it shall be unlawful for any such pool gate to be allowed to remain unfastened while the pool is not in use; and that such fence shall be constructed so as to come within two inches of the ground at the bottom and shall be at least five feet from the edge of the pool at any point." the code the restricts the the punative actions of a loacality tofine of not more than $300 or confinement in jail for not more than thirty days, either or both. Each day's violation may be construed as a separate offense." but with each day being a seperate offince it can add up.


A
gricultural Fence

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Virginia law as it pertains to fence in agricultrial applications is somewhat contradictory. When it comes to fencing used for livestock, there are two main schools of thought.

"Fence In" where the live stock are to be contrained on a given property via  dating back to 17th century english common law.(1) The other common philosophy is referred to as "Fence Out" in which it is the responsibility of a land owner who whishes to keep livestock off their property had to build their own fence. The type of fence law that applies changes from county to county. Here are a list of Virginia Counties who participate.

“Fence In” Counties: Albemarle, Arlington, Augusta, Bedford, Botetourt, Buckingham, Campbell, Charles City, Chesterfield, Clarke, Culpeper, Cumberland, Dickenson, Fauquier, Floyd, Fluvanna, Gloucester, Goochland, Greene, Halifax, Hanover, Isle of Wight, King George, Loudoun, Louisa, Madison, New Kent, Orange, Page, Patrick, Pittsylvania, Pulaski, Rappahannock, Roanoke, Rockingham, Russell, Scott, Southampton, Spotsylvania, Smyth, Sussex, Washington, Wise, Wythe, York.

“Fence Out” Counties are Accomack, Alleghany, Amelia, Amherst, Appomattox, Bath, Bland, Brunswick, Buchanan, Caroline, Carroll, Charlotte, Chesapeake, Craig, Dinwiddie, Essex, Fairfax, Franklin, Frederick, Giles, Grayson, Greensville, Hampton, Henrico, Henry, Highland, James City, King & Queen, King William, Lancaster, Lee, Lunenburg, Mathews, Mecklenburg, Middlesex, Montgomery, Nelson, Newport News, Northumberland, Northampton, Nottoway, Orange, Powhatan, Prince Edward, Prince George, Prince William, Richmond, Rockbridge, Shenandoah, Stafford, Suffolk, Surry, Tazewell, Virginia Beach, Warren, Westmoreland.

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The information above came frome https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/news/fbmu/2009/12/article_4.html

While wordy, provided below is the exact wording of "§ 55-299. Definition of lawful fence." taken from https://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+55-299.

§ 55-299. Definition of lawful fence.

Every fence shall be deemed a lawful fence as to any livestock named in § 55-306, which could not creep through the same, if

(1) Five feet high, including, if the fence be on a mound, the mound to the bottom of the ditch,

(2) Of barbed wire, 42 inches high, consisting of at least four strands of barbed wire, firmly fixed to posts, trees, or other supports substantially set in the ground, spaced no farther than 12 feet apart unless a substantial stay or brace is installed halfway between such posts, trees or other supports to which such wires shall be also fixed,

(3) Of boards, planks, or rails, 42 inches high, consisting of at least three boards firmly attached to posts, trees, or other supports substantially set in the ground,

(4) Three feet high within the limits of any incorporated town whose charter does not prescribe, nor give to the council thereof power of prescribing, what shall constitute a lawful fence within such corporate limits, or

(5) Any fence of any kind whatsoever, except as described in this section, and except in the case of incorporated towns as set forth in subdivision (4), which shall be:

a. At least 42 inches high,

b. Constructed from materials sold for fencing or consisting of systems or devices based on technology generally accepted as appropriate for the confinement or restriction of livestock named in § 55-306, and

c. Installed pursuant to generally acceptable standards so that applicable livestock named in § 55-306 cannot creep through the same.

A cattle guard reasonably sufficient to turn all kinds of livestock shall also be deemed a lawful fence as to any livestock mentioned in § 55-306.

Nothing contained in this section shall affect the right of any such town to regulate or forbid the running at large of cattle and other domestic animals within its corporate limits.

The Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services may adopt rules and regulations regarding lawful fencing consistent with this section to provide greater specificity as to the requirements of lawful fencing. The absence of any such rule or regulation shall not affect the validity or applicability of this section as it relates to what constitutes lawful fencing.

(Code 1950, § 8-869; 1977, c. 624; 2007, c. 574.)

There are other statues that allow for some bodies of water in certain circumstances to also be considered "Lawful Fences"  to include 55-300, 55-302, and 55-303. more information can be found at https://leg1.state.va.us/

Reguardless of whether a property is in a "Fence In" or Fence Out" county there are Virginia statutes that provide a means by which one land owner may compel a neighbor to aide in the construction or maintenance of a given boundry fence. The law also makes a dinstinction between existing and none existng boundry fence.

"Virginia fence law refers only to landowners.  The Code does not mention ‘tenants’ or ‘owners of livestock.’  This has very real implications for landowners who lease land to farmers with an understanding that the farmer-tenant maintains all fences. Landowners should be aware of their potential obligations and liability related to maintaining boundary fences."(1)

In summary the law surrounding fence is convoluted and often contradictory thus it is a good idea to get legal advice on these matters. Keep in mind that if the situation arises that a fence is to be mandated, there may be legal recourse for the construction and, or financing of a mandated fence when it lies between two properties.

Read Virginia Legislative Fence Ordinances in their etirity at the folllowing websites:

1.(https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/news/fbmu/2009/12/article_4.html)

2.(http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+15.2-921)

3.(http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+56-429)

4.(https://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+55-299)

Topics: Fence Design, Perimeter Security, Specifications, High Security Fence, Pool Gate Hardware, Regulation, Fence Maintenance, Richmond Fence, fence law, fence regulations, swimming pool regulations, agricultural fence, virginia fence code

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